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Category Archives: Compliance

GRC20/20 on Information Governance & Collaboration in Financial Services

Image of Wall Street“Collaboration and use of information has revolutionized how technology creates value for financial services firms. However, a challenge for financial services organizations is to govern information and collaboration across a distributed and dynamic environment. How does the financial services organization take advantage of the wealth of benefits that online collaboration platforms and pervasive access to information promises, while avoiding the compromise of confidentiality, integrity, and availability of critical business information, increased risk exposure, legal and regulatory actions?”

Excerpt from GRC20/20’s“Information Governance & Collaboration in Financial Services

FTC the “Other” Data Security Sheriff in Town

Decorative image of yellow people standing with Doctors lab coatsInformation security is top of mind in light of recent high profile breaches impacting millions of consumers. If you’re a healthcare organization, the need to protect patient data is paramount. The laws are getting more stringent and oversight from agencies other than HHS is around the corner.

The examples of this are clear. Consider the case involving LabMD, a medical testing laboratory and a covered entity under HIPAA. In August last year, the FTC filed a complaint against LabMD alleging the company exposed the personal information of about 10,000 people in two incidents. LabMD responded with its own missive: a motion to dismiss the complaint on the grounds that the FTC enforcement action clashed with HIPAA’s information security regulations.

Australian Privacy Act: How to Protect Against Penalties

Australian FlagIf the renewed Australian Privacy Act took you by surprise, you are not alone. The majority of 100 information security managers surveyed at medium to large Australian organizations were unprepared for the new privacy laws. That’s going to be a problem though for many as Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim plans to take a serious view of any business failing to protect personal data.

The new legislation dictates that both private and public sector data breaches must be reported to the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC), and consumers must be informed so they can take proactive steps to protect their data. To help enforce the legislation, the Privacy Commissioner can impose penalties for a breach of up to $340,000 for individuals and $1.7 million for companies.

Join HiSoftware at SharePoint Saturday NYC

SharePoint Saturday NYC is right around the corner and we hope to see you during the show. While in NYC, head on over to the HiSoftware Booth to learn more about our award-winning solutions for compliance and secure collaboration as well as our latest solution for SharePoint access and permissions management.

Decorative image of sheriff badgeMeet Our New Sheriff

While you’re at the booth be sure to ask about our latest solution Site Sheriff that leverages dynamic access, deny rules and a secure viewer to help ensure that only the right users can access the right content and help you keep confidential information in SharePoint.

  • Manage permissions through dynamic access and claims
  • Control access independent of location
  • Add security trimmings to the ribbon to control distribution
  • Provide secure document viewing with a zero footprint reader
  • Prevent downloads to desktop and mobiles
  • Lower the cost of managing sites

Book Signing with Chris McNulty!

Be one of the first 30 people to stop by our booth during the Lunch break from 12-12:40pm to receive a free signed copy of Chris’s latest book: SharePoint 2013 Consultant’s Handbook: A Practical Field Guide. Already have a copy? Bring it by for Chris to sign.

Speaking Session

Join our CTO, SharePoint MVP Chris McNulty, for his session:

Optimizing and Accelerating Your SharePoint Farm
Level: 300
Track: Advanced IT Pro
Time: 4:00 to 5:15pm

Join Chris for a review of memory and service optimization, high performance designs, disk and database optimization, security, and caching techniques to make things better. He’ll also review how to measure and interpret SharePoint’s own key performance indicators.

Decorative image of talking headTalk to Us

We welcome the opportunity to speak to you during the show about our award-winning HiSoftware Sheriff solutions to rein in compliance and secure collaboration in SharePoint.

  • Keep mission critical documents in SharePoint
  • Enforce governance and compliance policies
  • Secure document viewing and distribution control
  • Dynamic access and claims-driven permissions
  • Simplify Governance and Increase ROI
  • Built on SharePoint for ease of use and deployment

Interested in setting up a meeting or demo at the show?
Fill out a brief meeting request form or reply to this email with your preferred meeting date and time.

Examining Florida’s New FIPA Law for Data Breaches

Decorative image of the word privacyIn light of several recent massive customer data breaches, states have expanded their state information security laws to include different notification requirements.  Earlier this month, Florida enacted the Florida Information Protection Act of 2014 (“FIPA”), which replaced earlier version of a similar law.  While quite expansive, let’s take a brief look at the new FIPA—and see just how “new” a law it really is.

  1. FIPA’s definition of “personal information” is quite broad.  Most states define data breaches to be some identifying information (e.g. first initial and last name) PLUS some other data (e.g. bank account number, social security number, driver’s license number, etc).  FIPA has that as part of its definition.  What’s really new is that just a username/password combination constitutes “personal information.”  Suddenly thrown into the realm of data breach notification laws are the inclusion of bulletin boards and discussion sites.  A bit novel but not earth-shattering.
  2. FIPA requires notification to the Florida Attorney General when a breach involves 500 or more Florida residents.  This isn’t particularly novel as other states, such as California, Idaho, Louisiana, Maryland, New York, and New Jersey (plus a bunch of others) have had similar types of requirements for years.
  3. FIPA involves third-parties that hold or warehouse a company’s data, and then suffer a breach.  Again, this isn’t particularly new—Connecticut, for instance, has included a similar requirement since 2011.

Are these laws going too far and becoming too onerous for companies?  Certainly, that is the position of some attorneys and lobbyists.  Personally, I have very little sympathy for this position.  First, most laws (except some narrow outdated examples) provide a huge exception for encrypted data.  In other words, if your company gets hacked and suffers a data breach, there aren’t any notification requirements if that data is encrypted.  Given how robust modern encryption technologies are, this makes sense because the bad guys can’t access the underlying data.  Second, the enormous potential harm (e.g. identity theft, credit card fraud, etc.) and the comparatively low cost of data encryption shifts the burden squarely on the side of the companies holding customer data.

At the same time, there is one aspect of this issue where I do feel some sympathy for companies suffering a data breach—the confusing myriad of different state laws!  In this online age, it simply doesn’t make sense for more than 99% of online activities to monitor or even care about what state their visitors come from.  Yet the state where a customer resides makes all the difference in data breach notification.  Different states require different types of notifications to different people and at different times.  For all but the largest companies with the biggest legal teams, this is a nightmare.  This plethora of different state laws also makes non-compliance much more likely—which ultimately hurts consumers.  I would much rather see a uniform Federal data breach notification law.  Alternatively, professional organizations like the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) can create a model standard that states can choose to adopt—much in the same way that the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct help shape different state bar ethical requirements.

Learn how HiSoftware’s automated encryption solutions help prevent data breaches.

SharePoint’s Most Wanted Governance Offenders

Earlier this year, we asked you to tell us about the biggest offenders in SharePoint who are constantly putting their organizations at risk, bypassing governance and training, and whose bad habits are frustrating their co-workers. Meet the 5 Most Wanted characters we uncovered in our new infographic, and learn a few helpful tips to stop them in their tracks.

Infographic image of Most Wanted Offenders

Download a copy of the SharePoint’s Most Wanted Governance Offenders Infographic.

 

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Compliance

decorative images of fireworksAs we head into this Fourth of July weekend in the US, I started thinking about the Declaration of Independence and the well-known phrase “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness”.

This got me thinking about the industries we support and the many regulations our customers must comply with in order to keep their customers and employees personal information safe. These compliance regulations are designed to help to support the idea that you will be free to pursue your life in an information-driven, digital world —  without jeopardizing your privacy.

CalOPPA, Do Not Track and Website Privacy Statements

Decorative image of the word privacyOn January 1, an amendment to California’s Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA) went into effect.  In a nutshell, the biggest impact on organizations is that they have to disclose their policies on Do Not Track (DNT) signals from a user’s browser.

Unfortunately, this all gets complicated fast for a couple of reasons.  First, DNT isn’t a completed standard, so even a diligent Web operator can’t know exactly what counts as a DNT signal.  Second, the California Attorney General has been issuing guidance on the contents of privacy policies for DNT—and, while they are designed to promote transparency, they only seem to obfuscate tracking practices.   Fortunately, this guidance is not mandatory.  Third, the CalOPPA Amendment fits in a bigger structure set forth in CalOPPA.  Setting forth all of the details of CalOPPA is well beyond the scope of this short “heads up” blog post.

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