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Category Archives: Collaboration

Message In a Bottle – Identity and Access Management in the SharePoint World

Decorative image of ship in bottle

Source: http://en.wikicollecting.org/antique-ships-in-bottles

For a long time, identity and access management (IAM) has been something outside the world of most implementations. Who you are, and what you can do, have stayed almost entirely within the walled garden of SharePoint farms.

Over the past few years, however, SharePoint’s been spilling out of its bottle – into the cloud and into engagement with users and systems outside the realm of on-premises data centers, networks, and Active Directory. IAM is no longer something done for “other” enterprise systems, but important to consider as new usage comes into SharePoint, and as SharePoint apps and content are extended outside the traditional farm.

SharePoint 2013 Tips – Part 5 Co-Authoring and OneDrive

In my final post of my five part series on SharePoint 2013 tips, I’m focusing on co-authoring and OneDrive for business. You can also read my last four blogs here:

  1. Part 1 Scale, Sprawl and Control
  2. Part 2 Sharing, Sending and Storage
  3. Part 3 SharePoint Branding and ILM
  4. Part 4 New Collaboration

Co-authoring

Co-authoring, or letting multiple users edit a document simultaneously, was introduced in SharePoint 2010. But there were all sorts of rules – Excel only worked with the OWA browser client, whole PowerPoint and Word only allowed co-authoring from the desktop “rich” client.  In Office 2013, it doesn’t matter – you can mix and match multiple clients simultaneously.   Everyone can see the changes as they are made – and you can see who else is editing and see when updates are posted.   For example, in Word, the window chrome at the bottom of the screen is informative:

SharePoint 2013 Tips – Part 4 New Collaboration

Over the last few weeks, I’ve offered my advice for SharePoint 2013 collaboration discussing:

Today I’m discussing new collaboration.

New Collaboration

In 2003, working on documents in SharePoint was centered on the idea of “single occupancy vehicles”.  Much of the functionality was based on this sort of editing process:

  1. Original author writes a document
  2. Document version 1 uploaded to SharePoint
  3. First author sends an email to reviewers asking for updates
    1. First reviewer “checks out” the document
    2. Other people wait until the document “becomes available”
    3. First reviewer makes further edits
    4. Document checked back in (version 1.1)
    5. Edits are reviewed and approved
    6. Second reviewer checks out document, edits, checks in version 1.2)
    7. Process continues until document version 2.0 is published and updates are seen by :everyone”
    8. Additional document updates continue by returning to Step 3.

SharePoint’s Most Wanted Governance Offenders

Earlier this year, we asked you to tell us about the biggest offenders in SharePoint who are constantly putting their organizations at risk, bypassing governance and training, and whose bad habits are frustrating their co-workers. Meet the 5 Most Wanted characters we uncovered in our new infographic, and learn a few helpful tips to stop them in their tracks.

Infographic image of Most Wanted Offenders

Download a copy of the SharePoint’s Most Wanted Governance Offenders Infographic.

 

SharePoint 2013 Tips – Part 3 Branding SharePoint & ILM

To date in my SharePoint 2013 tips series I’ve discussed information architecture at scale, site sprawl and version control in part one and sharing and sending documents as well as storage in part two. Today’s third part of my series I’m discussing branding SharePoint and Information Lifecycle Management.

Decorating SharePoint

No more blue boxes. Literally.  SharePoint “branding” used to be a more esoteric science of hand tooled features and CSS files.  SharePoint 2010 introduced the seldom-used ability to define custom site themes by using PowerPoint.  That was an interesting step (no one ever used it), but now you can make key changes directly from the browser using Composed Looks.

With Composed Looks, a site owner can restyle a site with custom layouts, fonts, colors and background images.  Here’s the editing screen – you get here from the Site Settings menu option.  Or just pick “Change the look” from the setting “gear” icon in the top right of the screen.

SharePoint 2013 Tips – Part 2 Sharing, Sending and Storage

Last week I published part one in my series on SharePoint 2013 collaboration focused on information architecture at scale, site sprawl and version control. Today I’m discussing sharing and sending documents as well as storage.

Sharing and sending

Redundant content proliferates when copying files is simpler than moving them.   As a result, in 2003 when users had documents to share with a broader audience, they would copy them to places those users had access, leaving behind older versions each time.

In 2013, there’s a better way.  When you save a document – to your Personal Site or a team site, you now have a simple way to share it with everyone – a Share menu item.   Share allows users to keep one version of the document, bringing new, selected users to it instead of shipping the document to the users.  And if users don’t have authorization to change permissions, Share requests are routed to administrators for approval. 

Webinar: Do You Have SharePoint Site Headaches?

Decorative image of foldersEvery year, the volume of enterprise content in SharePoint grows. Now, more than ever, organization are also using SharePoint for mission-critical, confidential, sensitive or highly regulated documents.

Microsoft has made great strides in capacity and performance – but the scale of content management is daunting for most IT teams. Setting up individual permissions on each separate document is overwhelming; and the sprawling architecture of thousands of small redundant sites is just as challenging.
Some common problems include:

  • Keeping up with document growth while preventing site sprawl.
  • Using business rules instead of IT security to dynamically control access.
  • Keeping managed content inside SharePoint instead of email and unmanaged storage.
  • Streamlining the user interface and accelerating user adoption.
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