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Category Archives: SharePoint

How to Control Non-Employee Access to SharePoint

Decorative image of peopleChanges to SharePoint 2013 licensing have made it affordable for companies to build non-employee access portals in SharePoint. The expectation was that companies would rapidly deploy non-employee portals to collaborate with clients and suppliers. The reality is that very few SharePoint customers have deployed these portals.

Message In a Bottle – Identity and Access Management in the SharePoint World

Decorative image of ship in bottle

Source: http://en.wikicollecting.org/antique-ships-in-bottles

For a long time, identity and access management (IAM) has been something outside the world of most implementations. Who you are, and what you can do, have stayed almost entirely within the walled garden of SharePoint farms.

Over the past few years, however, SharePoint’s been spilling out of its bottle – into the cloud and into engagement with users and systems outside the realm of on-premises data centers, networks, and Active Directory. IAM is no longer something done for “other” enterprise systems, but important to consider as new usage comes into SharePoint, and as SharePoint apps and content are extended outside the traditional farm.

HiSoftware Site Sheriff Version 2.0 Now Available

Logo of HiSoftwareCompanies continue to leverage SharePoint for internal and external collaboration. As a result, site administrators face many challenges including how to control content access, foster user adoption, manage large lists and build non-employee portals. Today we’ve released Site Sheriff 2.0 to solve these challenges.

Protecting Data as Breach Costs and Penalties Rise

Image of dollar signIf you can put your hand over your heart right now and say that employees are completely following your data governance policies to keep customer, partner, and fellow employee information safe, then you do not need to read further. However, for the rest of us, we suggest you read on.

SharePoint 2013 Tips – Part 5 Co-Authoring and OneDrive

In my final post of my five part series on SharePoint 2013 tips, I’m focusing on co-authoring and OneDrive for business. You can also read my last four blogs here:

  1. Part 1 Scale, Sprawl and Control
  2. Part 2 Sharing, Sending and Storage
  3. Part 3 SharePoint Branding and ILM
  4. Part 4 New Collaboration

Co-authoring

Co-authoring, or letting multiple users edit a document simultaneously, was introduced in SharePoint 2010. But there were all sorts of rules – Excel only worked with the OWA browser client, whole PowerPoint and Word only allowed co-authoring from the desktop “rich” client.  In Office 2013, it doesn’t matter – you can mix and match multiple clients simultaneously.   Everyone can see the changes as they are made – and you can see who else is editing and see when updates are posted.   For example, in Word, the window chrome at the bottom of the screen is informative:

Join HiSoftware at SharePoint Saturday NYC

SharePoint Saturday NYC is right around the corner and we hope to see you during the show. While in NYC, head on over to the HiSoftware Booth to learn more about our award-winning solutions for compliance and secure collaboration as well as our latest solution for SharePoint access and permissions management.

Decorative image of sheriff badgeMeet Our New Sheriff

While you’re at the booth be sure to ask about our latest solution Site Sheriff that leverages dynamic access, deny rules and a secure viewer to help ensure that only the right users can access the right content and help you keep confidential information in SharePoint.

  • Manage permissions through dynamic access and claims
  • Control access independent of location
  • Add security trimmings to the ribbon to control distribution
  • Provide secure document viewing with a zero footprint reader
  • Prevent downloads to desktop and mobiles
  • Lower the cost of managing sites

Book Signing with Chris McNulty!

Be one of the first 30 people to stop by our booth during the Lunch break from 12-12:40pm to receive a free signed copy of Chris’s latest book: SharePoint 2013 Consultant’s Handbook: A Practical Field Guide. Already have a copy? Bring it by for Chris to sign.

Speaking Session

Join our CTO, SharePoint MVP Chris McNulty, for his session:

Optimizing and Accelerating Your SharePoint Farm
Level: 300
Track: Advanced IT Pro
Time: 4:00 to 5:15pm

Join Chris for a review of memory and service optimization, high performance designs, disk and database optimization, security, and caching techniques to make things better. He’ll also review how to measure and interpret SharePoint’s own key performance indicators.

Decorative image of talking headTalk to Us

We welcome the opportunity to speak to you during the show about our award-winning HiSoftware Sheriff solutions to rein in compliance and secure collaboration in SharePoint.

  • Keep mission critical documents in SharePoint
  • Enforce governance and compliance policies
  • Secure document viewing and distribution control
  • Dynamic access and claims-driven permissions
  • Simplify Governance and Increase ROI
  • Built on SharePoint for ease of use and deployment

Interested in setting up a meeting or demo at the show?
Fill out a brief meeting request form or reply to this email with your preferred meeting date and time.

SharePoint 2013 Tips – Part 4 New Collaboration

Over the last few weeks, I’ve offered my advice for SharePoint 2013 collaboration discussing:

Today I’m discussing new collaboration.

New Collaboration

In 2003, working on documents in SharePoint was centered on the idea of “single occupancy vehicles”.  Much of the functionality was based on this sort of editing process:

  1. Original author writes a document
  2. Document version 1 uploaded to SharePoint
  3. First author sends an email to reviewers asking for updates
    1. First reviewer “checks out” the document
    2. Other people wait until the document “becomes available”
    3. First reviewer makes further edits
    4. Document checked back in (version 1.1)
    5. Edits are reviewed and approved
    6. Second reviewer checks out document, edits, checks in version 1.2)
    7. Process continues until document version 2.0 is published and updates are seen by :everyone”
    8. Additional document updates continue by returning to Step 3.
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